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14 Aug 1999
23:31:35

An idea I'm considering from this text is that, like the pillar of fire going from in front of, to behind, the people of Israel. Sometimes God calls us to change our way of thinking or direction. The pillar of fire went from leading them to protecting them (from a different direction). What if the Israelites went toward the protecting pillar instead of across the seabed? I'd be interested in thoughts on this interpretation. RP


Date:
06 Sep 1999
Time:
10:59:55

Comments

I’m trying to use the readings from Exodus as a mini series for a few weeks ...

Sept 5th Trinity 14 Exodus 12:1-14 Celebrating God’s presence (In Communion)

Sept 12th Trinity 15 Exodus 14:19-31 & Matt 18:21-35 God’s presence to save

Sept 19th Trinity 16 Exodus 16:2-15 & Mat 20:1-16 God’s presence day by day

Sept 26th Trinity 17 Exodus 17:1-7 & Matt 21:23-32 God’s presence ?

Oct 3rd Trinity 18 Exodus 20: 1-20 God’s presence to guide

Oct 10th Trinity 19 Exodus 32:1-14 & Matt 22:1-14 God’s presence is lost

Also too late for last week, when I was on holiday, and couldn't post this one, but recently I came across a Communion prayer that is modelled a bit on the Passover ... you might like to use it - it involves children in asking questions. We break it up with singing a simple song, but you could take that out and just use the questrion and answer bits.

WE GIVE THANKS The Lord is here His Spirit is with us

Lift up your hearts We lift them to the Lord

Let us give thanks to the Lord our God It is right to give Him thanks and praise.

Child: Why do we give thanks and praise to God?

Leader: Because he has created all that is and he has given us life. He is the Lord of all, yet he loves each one of us as fathers and mothers love their children.

Sing: Thankyou Jesus, thankyou Jesus, Thank you Lord for loving me. x2

Child: Why do we remember Jesus?

Leader: Because he was sent from God and he gave up his life for us on the cross. God raised him from the dead so that we might see that death is not the end, but the beginning of a new life. The life of Jesus showed us how to live.

Sing: You went to Calvary, and there you died for me, Thank you Lord for loving me. x2

You rose up from the grave, to me new life you gave, Thank you Lord for loving me. x2

Child: Why is the bread important?

Leader: Because God created it and human hands have made it. Broken, it is a sign of Jesus’ suffering for us. It will become for us the bread of life.

Child: Why is the wine important?

Leader: Because God created it, and human hands have made it. Poured out, it is a sign of his saving love for us. It will become for us the cup of life.

Sing: Thankyou Jesus, thankyou Jesus, Thank you Lord for loving me. x2

Leader: Father we ask that by the power of your Holy Spirit, these gifts of bread and wine may be for us the body and blood of Jesus. Who on the night that he was betrayed, took bread and broke it; he gave it to his disciples saying “Take eat, this is my body which is given for you.” After supper he took the cup and said “Drink this , for this is my blood which is shed for you for the forgiveness of sins” Do this in remembrance of me.”

Christ has died, Christ is risen, Christ will come again. Leader: Heavenly Father, pour your Holy Spirit into our lives; We have remembered the suffering of Jesus: so may we be willing to offer our lives. We have celebrated his resurrection: so may we be filled with his life, As we wait for his coming again in glory, may we look for him to work among us.

Sing: You’re coming back again, and we with you shall reign Thank you Lord for loving me. x2

Thankyou Jesus, thankyou Jesus, Thank you Lord for loving me.

Leader As Jesus taught his disciples, so we pray. All Our Father in Heaven, hallowed be your name, your kingdom come, your will be done, on earth as in heaven. Give us today our daily bread. Forgive us our sins as we forgive those who sin against us. Lead us not into temptation But deliver us from evil. For the kingdom, the power, and the glory are yours now and for ever, Amen.

Leader We break this bread to share in the body of Christ. All Though we are many, we are one body, because we all share in one bread.


Date:
06 Sep 1999
Time:
11:02:26

Comments

whoops, O forgot to sya who I am, and why we used that communion prayer. We used it to lionk in this the reading from Exodus on 5th September about the passover, and focussed on the communion being like the passover, remembering a special event, in our case the death and resurrection, like the israelites remembered the Exodus.

Rev Ev in UK


Date:
06 Sep 1999
Time:
11:03:27

Comments

Just some early thoughts on this passage.

It’s noit about a battle between Egypt and Israel ... it’s an account of God’s action to save.

The Exodus was a truning point. God had been active before ... but after this, Israel was no longer just a family dynasty, but a people. We know it was a turning point because of the way it was remebered. ( I wondered how many references to the Exodus there are in the OT?)

That made me think of people’s journey of faith ... I was talking to someone recently about their experience of God and they were talking about a friend whom they described as ‘Christian’, but without an active personal faith. Without in any way wanting to make a judgment on this person’s faith, I asked her about her own experience, and as she talked, she realised that actually, although she had always thought of herself as a Christian, there had been a point at which it had all ... ‘kicked in’ There was a complete change in her life and attitude to God after that time. A crisis ( in her case divorce) in her life coincided with of ‘kicking in’ and becoming real in a way God hadn’t been before.

The Exodus seems a bit like that ... God is undoubtedly active before that point, but something decisive happens in the Exodus that is all about God’s salvation from slavery to the Egyptians. In the same way, God is active in our lives long before we come to the time where God’ kicks in’ for us, but for the Christian, there is a time, or a period of time ( which may be a long time, but nevertheless identifiable), when we can look back and say that’s when I really began to follow Christ.

Also interesting, is that as they approached the Red Sea, being chased by Egyptians, the sea in front (although it was to be the measn of their salvation) was a barrier. How often to apparent barriers, or problems turn pout to be a way through to salvation. (Like my friend’s experience with divorce). How often does God turn things upside down!

Is this where the expression ‘Between the Devil and the deep blue sea’ comes from?

Rev Ev In UK


Date:
06 Sep 1999
Time:
11:05:54

Comments

Just some early thoughts on this passage.

It’s noit about a battle between Egypt and Israel ... it’s an account of God’s action to save.

The Exodus was a truning point. God had been active before ... but after this, Israel was no longer just a family dynasty, but a people. We know it was a turning point because of the way it was remebered. ( I wondered how many references to the Exodus there are in the OT?)

That made me think of people’s journey of faith ... I was talking to someone recently about their experience of God and they were talking about a friend whom they described as ‘Christian’, but without an active personal faith. Without in any way wanting to make a judgment on this person’s faith, I asked her about her own experience, and as she talked, she realised that actually, although she had always thought of herself as a Christian, there had been a point at which it had all ... ‘kicked in’ There was a complete change in her life and attitude to God after that time. A crisis ( in her case divorce) in her life coincided with of ‘kicking in’ and becoming real in a way God hadn’t been before.

The Exodus seems a bit like that ... God is undoubtedly active before that point, but something decisive happens in the Exodus that is all about God’s salvation from slavery to the Egyptians. In the same way, God is active in our lives long before we come to the time where God’ kicks in’ for us, but for the Christian, there is a time, or a period of time ( which may be a long time, but nevertheless identifiable), when we can look back and say that’s when I really began to follow Christ.

Also interesting, is that as they approached the Red Sea, being chased by Egyptians, the sea in front (although it was to be the measn of their salvation) was a barrier. How often to apparent barriers, or problems turn pout to be a way through to salvation. (Like my friend’s experience with divorce). How often does God turn things upside down!

Is this where the expression ‘Between the Devil and the deep blue sea’ comes from?

Rev Ev In UK


Date:
06 Sep 1999
Time:
11:07:42

Comments

I’m trying to use the readings from Exodus as a mini series for a few weeks ...

Sept 5th Trinity 14 Exodus 12:1-14 Celebrating God’s presence (In Communion)

Sept 12th Trinity 15 Exodus 14:19-31 & Matt 18:21-35 God’s presence to save

Sept 19th Trinity 16 Exodus 16:2-15 & Mat 20:1-16 God’s presence day by day

Sept 26th Trinity 17 Exodus 17:1-7 & Matt 21:23-32 God’s presence ?

Oct 3rd Trinity 18 Exodus 20: 1-20 God’s presence to guide

Oct 10th Trinity 19 Exodus 32:1-14 & Matt 22:1-14 God’s presence is lost

Also too late for last week, when I was on hliday, but I came across a Communion prayer that is modelled a bit on the Passover ... you might like to use it - it involves children in asking questions. We break it up with singing a simple song, but you could take that out and just use the questrion and answer bits.

WE GIVE THANKS The Lord is here His Spirit is with us

Lift up your hearts We lift them to the Lord

Let us give thanks to the Lord our God It is right to give Him thanks and praise.

Child: Why do we give thanks and praise to God?

Leader: Because he has created all that is and he has given us life. He is the Lord of all, yet he loves each one of us as fathers and mothers love their children.

Sing: Thankyou Jesus, thankyou Jesus, Thank you Lord for loving me. x2

Child: Why do we remember Jesus?

Leader: Because he was sent from God and he gave up his life for us on the cross. God raised him from the dead so that we might see that death is not the end, but the beginning of a new life. The life of Jesus showed us how to live.

Sing: You went to Calvary, and there you died for me, Thank you Lord for loving me. x2

You rose up from the grave, to me new life you gave, Thank you Lord for loving me. x2

Child: Why is the bread important?

Leader: Because God created it and human hands have made it. Broken, it is a sign of Jesus’ suffering for us. It will become for us the bread of life.

Child: Why is the wine important?

Leader: Because God created it, and human hands have made it. Poured out, it is a sign of his saving love for us. It will become for us the cup of life.

Sing: Thankyou Jesus, thankyou Jesus, Thank you Lord for loving me. x2

Leader: Father we ask that by the power of your Holy Spirit, these gifts of bread and wine may be for us the body and blood of Jesus. Who on the night that he was betrayed, took bread and broke it; he gave it to his disciples saying “Take eat, this is my body which is given for you.” After supper he took the cup and said “Drink this , for this is my blood which is shed for you for the forgiveness of sins” Do this in remembrance of me.”

Christ has died, Christ is risen, Christ will come again. Leader: Heavenly Father, pour your Holy Spirit into our lives; We have remembered the suffering of Jesus: so may we be willing to offer our lives. We have celebrated his resurrection: so may we be filled with his life, As we wait for his coming again in glory, may we look for him to work among us.

Sing: You’re coming back again, and we with you shall reign Thank you Lord for loving me. x2

Thankyou Jesus, thankyou Jesus, Thank you Lord for loving me.

Leader As Jesus taught his disciples, so we pray. All Our Father in Heaven, hallowed be your name, your kingdom come, your will be done, on earth as in heaven. Give us today our daily bread. Forgive us our sins as we forgive those who sin against us. Lead us not into temptation But deliver us from evil. For the kingdom, the power, and the glory are yours now and for ever, Amen.

Leader We break this bread to share in the body of Christ. All Though we are many, we are one body, because we all share in one bread.

We used this form of communion to link in with the reading from Exodus about the passover meal, and to remind ourselves that thye communion meal is to remember Jesus work for us in death and resurrection.

Rev Ev in UK


Date:
06 Sep 1999
Time:
21:41:16

Comments

whoops, soory! I haven't quite got the hang of this yet. Rev ev in Uk.


Date:
06 Sep 1999
Time:
22:01:53

Comments

I find this a difficult passage to preach on, but only because of the war images. Though the focus is the saving act of God, and thus begins the salvation history of Israel, it is still grounded in the warring success of Israel and the destruction of thier enemies.

If I can still do justice to the text, I do plan to focus on God's presence with us as we move out of slavery and toward freedom (a very scary journey indeed).


Date:
07 Sep 1999
Time:
17:47:57

Comments

07 SEP 99

Agreeing with (part of) Rev Ev's emphasis and the annonymous contributor: There is a lot of new life/opportunity/possiblity in this text. Someone reminded me that many CHristians "add" at least one--and often, two--"New year's" celebrations, in addition to the DEC 31/JAN 1 commemoration. Advent starts the year for liturgicals; the SUnday after Labor Day is the beginning of the often-times more active season of education, outreach and general activity at a church. The Lord provides a way... often a "new", unexpected route, for us. From the "AHA!" preaching resource, a relevant bit of humor is suggested: Moses standing beside the parted sea envoking the crossing by the Israelites says, "Go accross!" No one moves. "Why are you just standing there?!" he bellows. "We don't want to get our feet muddy!" How will we "dive" into our opportunities/call to be God's purposeful Church? Peter in CA


Date:
07 Sep 1999
Time:
19:35:35

Comments

Picking up on the reference by Peter in CA from AHA!!! (muddy waters), there is another reference in that publication that I find helpful: "Are we saved FROM something, a backward looking thing? Or are we saved FOR something, when we focus on what's on the other side of the wilderness."

From this I make the following observation:

?The church of Jesus Christ is at its best when we are moving.

It’s tempting to try to stand still - to rest, to mark time, to catch up. But you don’t stand still in the church for very long before you begin slipping backwards.

This backward slide may at first be virtually imperceptible -- so subtle that you aren’t even aware it’s happening. But then it increases - the backward slide becomes faster, and harder to stop,until a point is reached where it may be too late to stop it.

Just some early thoughts. Ron in ON


Date:
08 Sep 1999
Time:
00:07:24

Comments

Off topic: Rev Ev, you anywhere near NYorks? Just got back from a luuuuvly pulpit exchange in UK, homesick! kculp@awod.com


Date:
08 Sep 1999
Time:
00:22:15

Comments

The International Lesson Series of Sunday School lessons has an Exodus series this month also: Sep. 5 - Ex 3:1-12 - Called to involvement Sep. 12 - Ex 13:17-14:31 - Called to deliverance Sep. 19 - Ex 19:1-20:21 - Called to covenant Sep. 26 - Ex 40:1-33, Lev 26 - Called to obedience I noticed some perceptive comments in the Advocate (SC Methodist newspaper) about these passages and was conviinced to do a semi-lectionary series.


Date:
08 Sep 1999
Time:
00:24:37

Comments

That was kbc in sc


Date:
08 Sep 1999
Time:
00:44:31

Comments

There's a wonderful prayer for the Seder - I think it's called "Dyenu" which means, it would have been enough. It's something like, Lord, if you had rescued us from the Egyptians without parting the Red Sea, it would have been enough. If you had parted the Sea without leading us in the wilderness, it would have been enough. If you had led us in the wilderness wthout giving us manna, it would have been enough. (and so on . . ) It's a neat prayer, and I've adapted it for other contexts. kbc in sc (having trouble posting . . trying again. . )


Date:
08 Sep 1999
Time:
02:42:12

Comments

Rev Ev in UK

you asked <<Is this where the expression ‘Between the Devil and the deep blue sea’ comes from? >>

answer is....."No"

that saying comes from sailing ship days... in short.... the plank of wood which runs just below the rail is called "the devil" or "debil"..... Boats which were caulked would leak and every so often the ship would have to be heeled over, a man lovered who could hammer more caulking in. He would be suspended there, at great risk..... "between the Devil, Debil and the deep blue sea". might be preachable for some text....

donhoff, elmira,NY


Date:
09 Sep 1999
Time:
03:48:25

Comments

I like this discussion so far. I wish more people would contribute to it.

In order to expand on the comment that the church is at its best when moving, I suggest yall look at verses 13-14. When the people grow restless, Moses commands them to stand still and watch God work. Verse 14 is great: "the LORD will fight for you, and you have only to keep still." What a wonderful proclammation for the anxiety prone and the busy bodies.

DeepSouth Steve


Date:
09 Sep 1999
Time:
03:56:46

Comments

Regarding the much enlightened comments by DeepSouth Steve:

1.) Verses 13 and 14 aren't in the lectionary, so how can I refer to them once I've already given my bulletin information to my secretary?

2.) Look at verse 15! While Moses may be commanding the people to keep still, God tells them to go forward. Either there is some faulty redaction going on here, or God is letting us know that Moses' bravado was a bunch of hot air.

Speaking of hot air, here is something I've coined (bumper sticker pending): "A Christian who does not act is like a wind that does not blow."

DeepSouth Steve #2


Date:
09 Sep 1999
Time:
15:45:31

Comments

I enjoy the comments on the texts. Thank you. I was thinking of comparing the Israelites at the Red Sea with our human nature not to trust God to remove the barriers which block our faith. I hope to connect it with the issue of forgiveness. I have worked with youth (and adults) who believe that God can't forgive them. To them their guilt is a barrier to the promised land of God's love. Just as the Red Sea is a barrier to the Israelites. Their past is like the Egyptians chasing them down. Steph


Date:
09 Sep 1999
Time:
17:43:11

Comments

To the issue of how to include verses preceding the lection: I will also be using some Scripture earlier than the lectionary text. The way I plan to do it is to "set up" the main passage by covering (in my case) the initial position of the pillar of fire/cloud in front of the Israelites, rather than behind. My point is that sometimes God calls us to change our way of thinking or direction from what we think is the right way. Since the Lection starts by referring to the angel of God, rather than the pillar of fire/cloud, moving to the rear of the Israelites to protect them, it is critical that I introduce the reading with the explanation that the Israelites were instructed to follow, not precede the pillar. RP